‘Exhibitionist’ stabbed to death by friend after exposing penis as ‘party trick’

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An ‘exhibitionist’ who liked to expose his penis as a ‘party trick’ was stabbed to death by his friend who thought he was being ‘sexually propositioned’, a court heard. Paul Lundy, 48, thought he was ‘God’s gift to ladies’ and would regularly expose his genitals in front of other people because he was ‘proud of its size’, jurors were told. But on May 22 he was knifed three times by Nathan Calder, 28, who claimed the victim had ‘sexually propositioned and manhandled him’. However, friends and family of Mr Lundy denied that he had been sexually interested in his friend and said he was ‘just a bit too affectionate when he had a drink’. Calder was found unanimously guilty of murder by a jury at Worcester Crown Court, despite claiming he had acted in self-defence. Mr Lundy and Calder had been friends for two years and were spending the evening drinking together when the incident occurred, the court heard. Jurors were told Calder had flown into a rage when Mr Lundy asked if he would perform a sex act on him. Prosecutor Jonas Hankin described the ensuing attack as ‘focused and determined’,  adding that Calder used ‘forceful stabbing at the vital structure of the face and neck’. He continued: ‘Whatever he might have said or done or whatever was the cause of the outbreak of violence, the intensity of the violence Mr Calder used in response to an unarmed man was grossly disproportionate and unreasonable.’ Ronald Saunders, a friend of Mr Lundy’s, said the victim had been an ‘extrovert’, who had once ‘undressed completely’ in front of him, causing him to leave. Giving evidence, he continued: ‘He was constantly cuddling up too much and it did make you feel uncomfortable. It wasn’t sexual. He was just too affectionate when he had a drink.’ Mr Lundy’s son, Lewis Hughes, told police he did not believe his father was sexually interested in men, but said he was ‘proud of the size of his penis’ and got it out as a ‘party trick’. While a eulogy, featured on the order of service for his funeral, stated that Mr Lundy was ‘a bit of a ladies’ man who wouldn’t leave his privates alone’. The court heard Edith Lundy, the victim’s sister, also told police: ‘It was a family joke. He was known for touching his privates and messing with himself. ‘The habit started as a young lad and he just never grew out of it. It was all in jest. He just wanted to make people laugh.’ Mr Lundy was found with severe facial injuries in a ‘pool of blood’ by his housemate at their Kidderminster home on May 23. The court heard Calder had a total of 24 convictions from 33 separate offences dating back to when he was a youth. He had previously sexually assaulted a child under the age of 13 and abused an older man when ‘carrying a claw hammer’, the prosecutor said. Mr Hankin also highlighted previous offences of battery, possession of a knife, affray, criminal damage and theft. Calder was sentenced to life imprisonment, with a minimum term of 17 years. Judge Robert Juckes QC told the defendant: ‘The sentence I pass onto you cannot repair the damage that you have done. The loss of a father and friend and relative is irreplaceable. ‘I don’t hesitate to find that My Lundy did some of those acts that you suggested. This could have been dealt with by moving out of his way. There should have been no difficulty with it. ‘You were perhaps disgusted by what he was doing and you became angry and you picked up the knife and you acted in anger which formed the intention to kill.’ After sentencing, Mr Lundy’s family described their ‘absolute devastation’ at his death and said they miss him ‘every single day’. The continued: ‘Our family will never be the same again. Paul was the life and soul of any family event and his presence is missed. ‘We would never want anyone to lose a loved one in this way or go through what we have over these past six months. ‘We would like to thank West Mercia Police and the prosecution counsel for all of their hard work on getting justice for Paul, and their support during the most difficult time in our lives.’